Conference CFP

Healthy or Unhealthy Cities? Urban History Group Conference 2018 Keele University, 5th & 6th April

Healthy or Unhealthy Cities? Urban environments, cultures and economies of public and private health, 1600 to the present.

By their very nature towns and cities were and still are potentially unhealthy spaces, beset by problems of disease, pollution and inadequate housing. Yet cities have also been centres for reform and significantly improved ‘health’ provision: the great leaps forward in sanitation, environmental and industrial regulation, provision of hospitals and other medical services were themselves driven by the pressures of urbanisation. Although this ‘progress’ was neither linear nor without significant resistance, the impetus to promote change and to extend provision could and did bind city communities together. Indeed, as recent assessments have shown, cities became the increasingly healthy option as services and environments improved.

The health of urban populations and healthiness of urban environments and experience, therefore, remain central to our understanding of how towns and cities do or do not function.  The 2018 UHG conference will explore how we interpret and historicise the highs and lows of urban health and environment alongside the responses and experiences these produce.

In framing your paper or making a proposal for a panel you may wish to consider some of the following:

  • How healthy or unhealthy were cities compared to say rural environments; in what sense were problems localised or area specific, and did this impact on the city’s aggregated view of itself?
  • How has the (un)healthy city been represented to urban dwellers? How important were the perceptions of health and/or inequality over empirical knowledge in determining outcomes?
  • What drove forward health, pollution, environmental, housing and sanitary reform?  Was it largely pragmatic or idealistic; economic or research driven; led by locals or national agents?
  • What role did protest and radical action play in changing approaches to urban health?
  • What is the role of class, age, gender, sexuality, or ethnicity in determining access to a healthy urban life?
  • What was the correlation between economic activity and urban health?  How has regulation and planning impacted upon economic and industrial productivity; what tensions arise in creating cities that are both healthy and wealthy?
  • In terms of medical provision, who were the key actors, why were they involved and what did they achieve?
  • What were the limits and strengths of ‘voluntaryism’, how involved was the community in this and in what ways did the voluntary, religious and state systems inter-react?

The conference committee invites individual papers and panel proposals of up to three papers. Papers might be in the form of thematic or case studies, cutting across time and space to draw out the larger-scale historical process at work in relation to the conference theme. Contributions ranging from c.1600 to the present are welcome and can be drawn from any geographical area. Contributions from doctoral candidates (see below) are an important feature of the Urban History Group conferences and so these, too, are encouraged and can be financially supported with modest bursaries.

 

Abstracts of up to 300 words, including a paper or panel title, name, affiliation and contact details should be submitted to theurbanhistorygroup@gmail.com and should indicate clearly how the content of the paper addresses the conference themes outlined above. Those wishing to propose sessions should provide a brief statement that identifies the ways in which the session will address the conference theme, a list of speakers, and abstracts. The final deadline for proposals for sessions and papers is 7th October 2017.

 

The conference will again host its new researchers’ forum, which is composed of two strands. The first is aimed primarily at those who are at an early stage of a PhD or early career research project. New researchers’ papers should be the same length and follow the same submission rules as the main sessions, but need not be related to the main conference theme. The second strand provides an opportunity for first-year PhD students to present a 10 minute introduction to their topic, archival materials, and the specific urban historiography. This is an opportunity to obtain feedback from active researchers in the field of Urban History, but also to introduce your work to colleagues in the field. Please submit all proposals to theurbanhistorygroup@gmail.com marking them clearly ‘New Researchers’ or ‘First Year PhD’ in the subject field and on the abstract.

 

Bursaries. Students registered for postgraduate study can obtain a modest bursary on a first come, first served basis to offset expenses associated with conference registration and attendance. Please send an e-mail application to Dr Nick Hayes at nick.hayes@ntu.ac.uk and also ask your supervisor to confirm your status as a registered postgraduate student with an e-mail to the same address. Deadline 8th December 2017. The Urban History Group would like to acknowledge and thank the Economic History Society for its support for these bursaries.

For further details please contact

Conference Organisers

 

Dr James Greenhalgh

University of Lincoln

Tel: 01522 83 7729

Email: jgreenhalgh@lincoln.ac.uk

 

Dr Markian Prokopovych

University of Birmingham

Tel: 0121 414 3259

Email: m.prokopovych@bham.ac.uk

For New Researchers

 

Dr Tom Hulme,

Queen’s University, Belfast

Tel: 028 90973312

Email: t.hulme@qub.ac.uk

 

 

Website: http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/urbanhistory/uhg

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CFP: Boundaries and Jurisdictions: Defining the Urban

Urban History Group Conference 2017

Royal Holloway, University of London, 30- 31 March

 

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Boundaries define towns and cities; jurisdictions legitimate those authorised to manage areas within them. While cities frequently annexed adjacent areas as a means of extending their authority,peripheral townships, regional jurisdictions and individual landowners have often resisted that process of absorption and the consequential loss of identity and autonomy. Do cities transmit ideas and ideologies to areas beyond their boundaries, urging compliance with administrative procedures and participating in infrastructural projects governing health, education, and transport? Were economies of scale in service provision a force for urban amalgamation? How have inhabitants navigated and perceived these boundaries, and what effects have they had on movement or identities? The conference will explore this theme of the urban ‘edge.’
Understanding where and what the edge is, though, is complex. Municipal authority is, of course, not bounded just by the city limits, but also by innumerable internal boundaries; boundaries that are not neutral in their management or their construction. We all live in multiple authorities – parishes, districts (school, medical, electoral), neighbourhoods, conservation areas, economic and regeneration zones. Myriad internal boundaries exist whose spatial extents rarely overlap and authority over them is vested in a mixture of legal bodies and informal authority. Informal authority reigns where the boundaries of mental maps are shaped by custom and practice – ‘safe’ areas, ‘red light’ districts, pedestrian precincts, ethnic and religious concentrations. The mosaic of overlapping boundaries and jurisdictions questions the use of the term city, since urban environments constitute so many different cities.
The conference committee invites individual papers and panel proposals of up to three papers. Papers might be in the form of thematic or case studies, cutting across time and space to draw out the larger-scale historical process at work in relation to boundaries and jurisdictions. Some of the themes, identified by bullet points below, are timeless so contributions ranging from c.1600 to the present are welcome and can be drawn from any geographical area. Contributions from doctoral candidates (see below) are an important feature of the Urban History Group and so these, too, are encouraged and financially supported with modest bursaries.

 

art_citadelle27

In framing your paper or making a proposal for a panel you may wish to consider some of the following:

· What is the difference between authority, regulation and jurisdiction, and does it matter?
· How have boundaries and jurisdictions shaped urban behaviour and vice versa?
· How durable are bounded limits like town charters, walls, and trading monopolies?
· How have rules and regulations involuntarily contributed to the creation of boundaries
· What informal mechanisms shape perceptions of boundaries, and how are these ‘edges’ enforced, transgressed or subverted?
· Is ‘Edge City’, rather than a recent phenomenon, a longstanding feature of urban development?
· How durable are mental maps and what are the consequences where they overlap?
· Can we write and talk about ‘the city’ if it is as fragmented as it may seem?

Abstracts of up to 300 words, including a paper or panel title, name, affiliation and contact details should be submitted to urbanhistorygroup2017@gmail.com and should indicate clearly how the content of the paper addresses the conference themes outlined above. Those wishing to propose sessions should provide a brief statement that identifies the ways in which the session will address the conference theme, a list of speakers, and abstracts. The final deadline for proposals for sessions and papers is 21st October 2016.

The conference will again host its new researchers’ forum, which is composed of two elements. The first section is aimed primarily at those who are at an early stage of a PhD or early career research project. New researchers’ papers should be the same length and follow the same submission rules as the main sessions, but need not be related to the main conference theme. Additionally, there will be opportunities for first-year PhD students to present a 10 minute introduction to their topic, archival materials, and the specific urban historiography. This is an opportunity to obtain feedback from active researchers in the field of Urban History, but also to introduce your work to colleagues in the field.
Please submit all proposals to urbanhistorygroup2017@gmail.com marking them clearly ‘New Researchers’ or ‘First Year PhD’ in the subject field and on the abstract.

Bursaries. Students registered for a PhD can obtain a modest bursary on a first come, first served basis to offset expenses associated with conference registration and attendance. Please send an e-mail application to Professor Richard Rodger at richard.rodger@ed.ac.uk and also ask your supervisor to confirm your status as a registered PhD student with an e-mail to the same address. Deadline 16th December 2016. The Urban History Group would like to acknowledge the Economic History Society for its support for these bursaries.

For Further Details Contact:
Conference Organisers
Dr James Greenhalgh
University of Lincoln
Tel: 01522 83 7729
Email: jgreenhalgh@lincoln.ac.uk

Dr Markian Prokopovych
University of Birmingham
Tel: 0121 414 3259
Email: m.prokopovych@bham.ac.uk

For New Researchers
Dr Tom Hulme,
IHR, University of London
Tel: 020 7862 8816
Email: Tom.Hulme@sas.ac.uk

Website:http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/urbanhistory/uhg/conference-2017/conference-2017

Beauty and the Hospital in History: Call for Papers

International Network for the History of Hospitals
Malta, 6–8 April 2017
Hosted by the Mediterranean Institute at the University of Malta, and the University of Warwick

INHH pics

 

Beauty, and its perceived absence or loss, has been a part of hospital experiences, therapies, and
planning throughout history. This conference aims to shed new light onto the history of beauty and
health by exploring the subjective concepts of beauty, ‘normality’, and their opposites within and
around the hospital.
This eleventh INHH conference will consider the relationship between beauty and the hospital in
history through an examination of five key themes: (1) the arts and the hospital; (2) landscape and
environment; (3) restoring beauty; (4) patient and staff experiences; and (5) beauty and the senses.
Below are more details about the themes the conference will address, along with related questions.
These themes and questions are by no means exhaustive, however, and we encourage the submission
of abstracts that discuss other aspects of beauty and the hospital in history in innovative ways.

Key Themes and Questions to be Explored:

1. The Arts and the Hospital:

  • How has the beauty of the arts been perceived to affect encounters within the hospital,
    been promoted by hospital patrons, or been used as a healing therapy in the hospital?

    •  Examples: Music, painting/s, festivities, crafts, creativity, architecture

2. Landscape and Environment:

  • How has the beauty of a landscape or environment — or its absence — shaped the choice
    of location for hospitals, and why?

    • Example: A medieval or colonial leprosy hospital situated in a beautiful landscape
      for its therapeutic value
      o Example: Asylums, isolation hospitals, or prison hospitals intentionally located in
      marginal, inaccessible or ‘ugly’ spaces, both urban and rural, and the consequences
      this was perceived to have on the health of patients
  • How have landscape and environment been adapted to affect hospital therapies and
    conditions?

    • Example: Hospital gardens
  • How did ancient ideas about the influence of environmental conditions upon health
    affect hospital care in the medieval and early modern periods?

3. Restoring Beauty:

  • Who decides what is beautiful or aesthetic, and whether and how that beauty should be
    restored? What strategies have been used in hospitals to restore or enhance that beauty,
    be it physical, mental, or emotional?

    • Example: Cosmetic surgery, prosthetics
    • Example: Psychotherapy to restore the perceived beauty of the mind
  • What happens when beauty or health cannot be fully restored? How have such
    therapies been depicted?

    • Example: Palliative care aimed at lessening suffering or alleviating the effects of
      ‘ugliness’; depictions of such care in before and after photographs, textbooks, and
      publicity material

4. Patient and Staff Experiences:

  • How have patients and staff experienced beauty or ugliness in hospitals? How and why
    has their access to beauty been encouraged or restricted?

    • Example: Hospital gardens for the use of patients only
    • Example: The isolation of patients in ‘ugly’ spaces as punishment
    • Example: The most beautiful spaces in a hospital compound restricted for the
      accommodation of European or white staff and patients
  • How was daily life in the hospital informed by the desire to create a beautiful order
    structuring the resident community?

    • Example: Ordinances and regulations inspired by religious or imperial precepts that
      guided daily life in residential hospitals

5. Beauty and the Senses:

  • How can we understand beauty — or its perceived absence — through the senses of
    smell, touch, sight, taste, and hearing? How has the hospital been a place for the care,
    enhancement, or experience of the beauty of these senses?

    • Example: Disgust surrounding ugly smells in hospitals; strategies to silence or
      shroud unsightly patients and practices
    • Example: The preferential hospitalisation of patients considered damaged in terms
      of their senses, e.g. the predominance of in-patients with a loss of nerve sensation
      in their hands and feet in colonial leprosy settlements

The Advisory Board of the INHH, as organisers of this conference, wish to invite proposals for 20
minute papers which address the conference theme. Potential contributors are asked to bear in mind
that engagement with the theme of beauty and the hospital will be a key criterion in determining
which papers are accepted onto the programme.

Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words in length, in English and accompanied by a brief self
biography of no more than 200 words. Proposals should be sent to beauty.inhh@gmail.com by
15 May 2016. As with previous INHH conferences, it is intended that an edited volume of the
conference papers will be published. Submissions are particularly encouraged from researchers who
have not previously given a paper at an INHH conference.

Upon provision of full receipts, we hope to be able to support attendance at this conference,
particularly for postgraduates and early career researchers. Speakers will be asked to make use of
alternative sources of funding where these are available.

Any queries may be directed to
beauty.inhh@gmail.com.

Voices of Madness Conference CFP

Voices of Madness

Centre for Health Histories, University of Huddersfield

15th- 16th Sept 2016

Voices image

In the thirty years since Roy Porter called on historians to lower their gaze so that they might better understand patient-doctor roles in the past, historians have sought to place the voices of previously, silent, marginalised and disenfranchised individuals at the heart of their analyses. Contemporaneously, the development of service user groups and patient consultations have become an important feature of the debates and planning related to current approaches to prevention, care and treatment. The aim of this conference is to further explore and reveal how the voices of people with experience of mental illness have been recorded and expressed. We hope to consider recent developments in these areas with a view to facilitating an interdisciplinary discourse around historical perspectives of mental health and illness.

The organisers invite proposals for twenty minute papers or panels, workshops, and roundtables of ninety minutes on the themes of voices of madness and mental ill health under headings including but not limited to:

• Oral history and testimony
• Community care
• Institutional histories
• The role of informal carers
• The growth of the mental health professions
• Mental ill health and the voice(s) of adolescents and children
• Museums and ‘heritage’
• Literature (fiction and non-fiction)
• Language of madness (if not covered by ‘heritage’)
• Dissenting voices
• Appropriation/advocacy
• Patient and community participation
• Absent voices
• Art
• Stigma
• Self expression

For more information contact Dr Rob Ellis (r.ellis@hud.ac.uk), Dr Sarah Kendal (s.kendal@hud.ac.uk) or Dr Steven Taylor (s.taylor@hud.ac.uk). To submit a paper proposal (250 words maximum) or express an interest, please contact Steve Taylor by 14 March 2015. We hope to offer some bursaries for postgraduate and early career researchers.