The History of Emergency Medicine Workshop

The History of Emergency Medicine Workshop
Crossing Boundaries: The History of First Aid in Britain and France, 1909-1989’ project
University of Huddersfield

  

Day One – 27 June 2018
Student Centre Boardroom

12-1.15pm

Welcome and Introductions, Introduction to ‘Crossing Boundaries: The History of First Aid in Britain and France, 1909-1989’ project, and Lunch

1.15pm-3.30pm

Pre-20th century

Lisa Smith, University of Essex
TBC (Early Modern First Aid advice in domestic handbooks)

Sally Frampton, University of Oxford
A Little Knowledge is a Dangerous Thing: The First Aid Movement in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Jennifer Wallis, Queen Mary University of London
“Ha! Ha! I am a b(u)oy again.” Henry Silvester and the life-saving method of self-inflation

3.45-5.15pm

Voluntarism and First Aid in France and Britain

Charles-Antoine Wanecq, Sciences Po
Saving lives, training citizens : the French Red Cross, the State and the control of first aid practices (1940s-1970s)

Stefan Ramsden, University of Hull
St John Ambulance and working-class community

Day Two – 28 June

Oastler 6.09

Project Sessions

9.30-10.30am

Rosemary Wall, University of Hull, and Barry Doyle, University of Huddersfield
First Aid on the Roads

10.45am-12noon

Jonathan Reinarz, University of Birmingham, Rebecca Wynter, University of Birmingham, and Shane Ewen, Leeds Beckett University

‘Burns’

12-1
Lunch

1-2
Student Centre Boardroom
Heritage

Interpreting First Aid Heritage collections at the Museum of the Order of St John and the British Red Cross Museum and Archive

2.15-3.30pm

War

Samiksha Sehrewat, University of Newcastle
Providing medical aid in an emergency: Charitable Organizations, the Mesopotamia Medical Breakdown and colonial governmentality

Susan Grayzel, Utah University
“Chemical Weapons Come Home: Devising Defences for Poison Gas in Interwar Britain and France”

3.30-4.30pm

Closing discussions and reflections on connections between the papers, publication, and the first aid history project and policy relevance over tea and coffee.

   

 

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