From Segregation to Integration in the English Hospital System: 1914-45

This post by Barry Doyle, Director of the Centre for the History of Public Health and Medicine, forms part of a series of short examinations of segregation and integration in hospital provision posted in preparation for the forthcoming conference of the International Network of the History of Hospitals in Dubrovnik in April 2015. Look out for the announcement of the programme very soon.

INHH

11-doyle-main1

Author: Professor Barry Doyle (University of Huddersfield)

In the years before the creation of the National Health Service (NHS) the hospitals of England were divided between two providers – acute and specialist voluntary institutions treating a range of mostly curable conditions and a much larger number of municipally controlled establishments providing isolation for infectious diseases or with roots in the nineteenth century poor law. On the eve of the Great War these providers drew their patients from distinct socio-economic groupings with patients segregated between paupers and the respectable sick poor, men and women, adults and children, the acute and the chronic, the dangerous and the safe, the old and the young, the curable and the incurable.

Architect’s Impression of the Completed King Edward VII Extension, Leeds, 1917 (Edward VII Memorial Appeal leaflet, West Yorkshire Archives, Leeds 2295/299) Architect’s Impression of the Completed King Edward VII Extension, Leeds, 1917
(Edward VII Memorial Appeal leaflet, West Yorkshire Archives, Leeds 2295/299)

Further distinctions emerged with the finance and management of institutions and from the…

View original post 1,017 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s